Ex Holmfirth Bridleway 94

Holmfirth BW 94 was at the bottom of the walls.

There have been increasing problems of obstruction and surface damage to Holmfirth Bridleway 94 since Kirklees granted planning permission to permit more quarry HGV access to the site. User groups made some reasonable comments on this application at the time, suggesting a speed limit, signage and a priority system putting non motorised users at the top. All ignored,of course.

Although the bridleway forms access to the quarry it is outside the red line boundary of the planning applications. There has been no planning application as far as PathWatch can see for any works to Bridleway 94. Although the quarry sites are industrial, Bridleway 94 remains in the greenbelt.

Difference in levels very clear in this photo.

It is something of a surprise then to see that the bridleway is being subject to some civil engineering works to both widen it and lower the level by up to 3 metres in places. Ironically in the supporting information for the planning application the applicant states “the HGV access route (bridleway 94) contains grass verges on both sides providing step off areas for pedestrians and cyclists should a HGV be travelling along the track.” These verges are now either 2 metres or more in the air or gone. The bridleway sign has also disappeared.

There’s some rather large plant operating on the bridleway at present with no consideration at all for the safety of public users.

Red line planning boundary. Bridleway is clearly outside this.

Yet another example, if one were needed, of Kirklees not properly considering public rights of way in the planning process. The bridleway is barely mentioned and clearly not seen as a valuable public amenity. There’s nothing put in place to protect the route and as everyone knows Kirklees are useless at enforcement be it in planning or public rights of way.

Bridleway 94

PathWath will report further on this issue but suspect Kirklees will deal with genuine public concerns via the usual evasion, incompetence and platitudes.

Useful information – Planing Enforcement highways.ross@kirklees.gov.uk Ward Councillors

See below for ignored comment on Planning Application.

Missing In Batley. Have You Seen Footpath No.5 ?

Photofit of Batley 5 drawn onto Google Maps.

Described as about 330 metres long and a metre wide, Batley Footpath 5 was reported missing some years ago. Police are becoming increasingly concerned about the right of ways whereabouts since it was last seen disappearing into the undergrowth by the M62. Experts into the many “disappeared” paths in Kirklees fear Batley 5 may have been kidnapped or groomed into becoming a Light Goods Vehicle Training yard.

If you have any information about Batley Footpath 5 please contact highways.ross@kirklees.gov.uk

Wolfstones – Holmfirth Footpath 60

Wolfstones

The public inquiry into diversion of Holmfirth Footpath 60 at Wolfstones reopens on 28th January 2022. At some point thereafter a decision will be made by the Inspector. Hopefully the order will not be confirmed and direct access to Wolfstone Heights will be maintained for the public benefit.

The final day of the inquiry is to hear closing submissions. The councils advocate’s statement can be read here . It’s a balanced and accurate case which reflects what was said at the inquiry.

Ruts R Us.

Fuel spill on Ramsden road.

The decades long mismanagement of Ramsden Road continues apace into 2022. Kirklees committed to close the road to damaging 4×4 vehicles and to repair it in 2018. It cocked up the legal order (after spending £10 grand on it) and ran away. A year ago it came up with a quick and cheap fix in the form of a public space protection order to be implemented in Spring 2021. This order has not yet come into force, largely because Kirklees don’t know what they are doing and seemingly have no mechanism for making such orders .

Had the order now been in place no vehicles would be permitted at all on Ramsden Road throughout the winter months. As it is so called “responsible” laners continue to use the road in all weathers and seasons. Lets be honest here, anyone driving a vehicle or motorbike on Ramsden Road in it’s current condition is irresponsible and is actively contributing to the continued destruction of the road to the detriment of non motorised users, residents and the environment. Predictably, the damage continues at an alarming pace and the road is now beyond any simple cost effective repair.

Fun fact, byways were originally recorded on Definitive Maps as routes mostly used by the public for the purposes of footpaths and bridleways ie walking and riding. Although the status acknowledged historical vehicular rights this was not the main public usage and of course the convoys of modern 4×4 vehicles now afflicting such lanes was unforeseeable in 1949.

A safe prediction for 2022 is that Ramsden Road will be worse by the end of it. The year has already started off badly with the Ruts R Us brigade extending their off piste activities into a new area on Footpath 175 just above Tinker Well – a private water supply. Another safe bet is that Kirklees Council, the Highway Authority with a statutory duty to maintain the Road, will do nothing. Having more or less exchanged bodily fluids with Ruts R Us over the past 3 years their position is more knackered than Ramsden Road itself.

Responsible use?

In addition to the new Ruts R Us off piste facility a fuel or oil leak has left a rainbow of filth washing down Ramsden Road. Attentive readers may recall that in addition to private water supplies in the area there are 2 public reservoirs below Ramsden Road into which run off from the road inevitably ends up. Quiet rightly, Yorkshire Water are requiring any repairs to the road include a sealed drainage system to ensure run off from the road cannot enter the public water supply as it can do now. That will be an incredible cost to the public to construct and maintain.

The only reason any of this happening is because Kirklees failed to follow the correct procedure when making an Experimental Traffic Regulation Order in 2018 which would have taken all public motor vehicles off Ramsden Road. This mistake has spawned a cock up pandemic without end.

Lady Ann Crossing & Batley Footpath 20.

Lady Ann Crossing & Batley 20 (image Google Earth)

Batley isn’t perhaps the first town in the borough you might go looking for a rural idyll but Lady Ann Crossing on Batley Footpath 20 is a bit of the Railway Children hanging on in the 21st century. Question is, for how much longer?

At the moment the signal box is staffed and path users can cross when it’s safe to do so. The signaler unlocks the gates and waves you through. A near perfect way to cross a live railway line. However, the fat controller wants to remove the current level crossing and staff as part of plans to “upgrade” the line which involve electrification and more trains.

There is currently a planning application for the works associated with removing the crossing and building a footbridge over the line which involves the rather fanciful diversion of Batley 20. See plan below.

The diversion proposal involves turning a straight forward 17m walk over the crossing into a convoluted marble run of 255m via steps or 355m via ramps. The inconvenience speaks for itself here and requires little further illumination.

Comments are open until 6th January 2022 via publicrightsofway@kirklees.gov.uk

Abseiling Skills Now Needed On Colne Valley Circular Walk

Ladder stile on Colne Valley Circular Walk (honestly it is).

On the look out for a good news story PathWatch took a ramble on the lovely Colne Valley Circular Walk. We wanted some pics of a new ladder stile that was due to replace the disintegrating structure shown above.

It’s taken 2 years get to the point of Kirklees “solving” this issue (we use the term loosely ) but sadly (or predictably) nowts happened.

The old ladder stile remains in situ and an abseil is required from the top of the wall to the field below. Not quite the In Pin on the Cullin Ridge perhaps but a technical descent nonetheless.

Top of the In Pin on the Colne Valley Circular Walk.

It’s worth noting that Highway Authorities such as Kirklees have very clear and effective powers under the Highways Act 1980 and can serve notice on out of repair stiles or gates requiring owners to carry out repairs. The notice period is 14 days ! After that the council can do the work and reclaim the costs.

We’re at 2 years here on a promoted route. Answers on a postcard please.

last Christmas I Gave You A Public Space Protection Order For Ramsden Road….

Off Piste Action

Last Christmas Kirklees came up with the improbable wheeze of putting a Public Space Protection Order on Ramsden Road and the Yateholme Lanes. According to officers, senior directors and local Councillors it was a brilliant idea! It was cheap, fast and not subject to too much public scrutiny. In addition a public spirited 4×4 membership group were happy to manage very limited vehicular access costing the council nothing.

What could possibly go wrong?

Beyond the usual cock up variants that afflict kirklees a number of foreseeable plot obstacles seem to have scuppered things. The legislation which governs these orders is the Anti Social, Crime and Policing Act 2014. This legislation isn’t mentioned in the Kirklees scheme of delegation and therefore officers do not have authority to make such orders which is what the council was proposing. This was pointed out to the council at an early stage. They ignored it.Only very recently have Kirklees admited they have to carry out some “delegation of powers”. oh dear.

Interestingly anyone who has been fined under one of the many other PSPO’s in force in Kirklees may well be entitled to a refund if the orders have been made without proper authority.

The Green Lane Association were originally the group who were to administer limited vehicular access for their members. This has changed. The council will administer the 30 something vehicle permits a week but anyone of the 30 million registered UK vehicles can apply for a permit! Unsurprisingly no department within Kirklees has volunteered for this task. It’ll be a long wait.

The Council has balked at the cost of the 4 barriers required to close the lane but will not release the figure. The much smaller barrier on the Castle Hill Byway cost £20k. So you are probably looking at 2 years rights of way maintenance budget.

At best the PSPO looks like an unwanted Christmas present and at worst yet another cock up which has mutated to evade any degree of competence or professionalism.

True Or False?

Bob, Kirkwheeze Director of Comedy & Infrastructure.

Even though Kirklees Council have a statutory duty to investigate claims of the existence of rights of way and have a “Priority” list of 212 outstanding applications going back to the 1980’s and limited resources for this work they are currently consulting on extinguishing a public footpath . Something they don’t have to do.

Calderdale On Naughty Step As Bridleways Built Over.

Halifax Bridleways 486 & 487 from Calderdales Online Prow Map.

Bridleways are like hens teeth in West Yorkshire. As multi user routes they are (theoretically) open to a much wider range of users. You might imagine they’d be protected or enhanced during the planning process. You would, of course, be wrong.

In a classic example of not paying any attention at all planners and highways officials at Calderdale have allowed 2 bridleways to have estate roads,footways,gardens,driveways and even a house built over them. The development (at Fountain Head Road) was granted planning permission in 2005 and there is little to show how public rights of way across the site, which also include a footpath, will be dealt with in the planning documents. Don’t forget public rights of way are(theoretically) a material consideration in the planning process.

There is mention of rights of way being a limitation and a plan showing the bridleways and footpath along with the development. Some 16 years later the plan more or less reflects where the houses and roads have been built over the rights of way. Presumably, the plan should have had the opposite effect?

These bridleways are now lost for ever but not because the developer has built over them. The local planning & highway authority, Calderdale Council, have failed to consider the bridleways as part of the 2005 planning process. Subsequent to this they have failed to prevent the stopping up of the bridleways by the development.

They are fully aware of what has happened at this site but the council’s shoddy performance continues in how it is now dealing with the obstructed footpath. More on this story later.