“Having viewed the photographs provided there is nothing much we could consider at these locations”

Ramsden Road

The quote above is from Councillor Naheed Mather the Kirklees Cabinet Member for the Environment and was made in response to viewing the photos in this post. The images are of course from Ramsden Road and Kiln Bent Lane, the scene of much 4×4 damage to both the highway and surrounding countryside. Perhaps a visit to Specsavers early in the New Year would be a good idea.

December 2020
Deliberate 4×4 damage to land adjacent to Kiln Bent Road

Magdallen Road Meltham Bridleway 50

Trashed

That you can can see the scar on the hillside from miles away is an indication of the extensive damage that has been done to Magdalen Road, a public bridleway in the Peak District National Park. The road is Meltham Bridleway 50 and it’s popular with mountain bikers, horse riders and walkers in equal measure.

The new surface on Meltham Bridleway 50

There’s a lack of suitable off road routes for equestrians and cyclists in both the national park and wider Kirklees. That any public bridleway can be treated in this manner is appalling and thoughtless but not a surprise. At the moment who has carried out the work remains a mystery. Kirklees are advising that the work is unauthorised and enquiries are ongoing. Let’s hope they tackle this head on and quickly!

Plot Thickens On West Nab

 

Following on from It’s Not A Rifle Range. You Don’t Have To Keep Out. a number of ramblers have got in touch to point out that the above sign is not in fact on its own. Oh no, it has friends stretching back over 500 metres to the legitimate exclusion zone. A wall of “Danger Keep Out” signs on what is public access land. Here is the legitimate keep out zone Deer Hill Site Notice – July 2019  The sign above and its friends are over 500 metres away! 

It’s Not A Rifle Range. You Don’t Have To Keep Out.

This sign has recently appeared on West Nab. The legal exclusion zone is 540 metres away.

Between Shooters Nab and West Nab there is an exclusion zone in the CROW Act access land. The area is a “fall of shot” zone where, theoretically, some stray shot may fall to the ground from the firing range north of Shooters Nab. Rather than use a red flag system to keep people off when live firing is actually taking place, the exclusion is at all times. The area is clearly marked on OS Maps and on the ground by the type of sign shown above. So far so good.

Except the sign above has only recently appeared and it is some 540 metres to the south and outside of the legal exclusion zone. Someone has gone to a lot of effort to put it there. This isn’t far away from similar signs and a fake dog ban sign highlighted in https://path-watch.com/2020/09/03/meltham-moor/

Down on Wessenden Head Road where the public have traditionally parked to access West Nab someone is putting boulders within the width of the public highway and digging holes in other long established parking spots.

We really aren’t welcome in areas of our own countryside it would seem.

The red dot mark location of KEEP OUT sign. It should be with it’s friends where the green dot is 500m away.

Ramsden Road – Environmental Damage Continues

Ramsden Clough
Off piste activity adjacent to Ramsden Road.

On a wet foggy walk it is easy to pinpoint Ramsden Road through the gloom. Just walk towards the loud high pitched sounds of motorbikes over revving as they destroy the local countryside. Hey presto you end up on the Somme like byway which lies within the Peak District National Park near Holmfirth. This unintended navigation aid could be seen as one of the few positive benefits of off roading. Though a map and compass are more environmentally friendly.

 

Ramsden Clough-3
Off piste 4×4 damage

A staggering level of incompetence from Kirklees Council and political interference from a couple of councillors have permitted the byway and adjacent land to continue to be trashed by vehicles. There is seemingly no end in sight to the environmental damage.

Both Kirklees Council and Holme Valley Parish Council have declared climate emergencies and are committed to making the area more walker friendly. Kirklees go as far as saying they wish to make the area a great place to walk and cycle! Hard to believe that when looking at these photos. Both council’s, and to some degree the Peak District National Park, stand by and look on, enabling this environmental degradation to continue.

Ramsden Clough-4

The vehicles that use Ramsden Road are more often than not aging 4×4’s pumping out black diesel fumes along with particulates from brakes and clutches. Nasty stuff for anything that breathes. These vehicles travel from all over the uk to pollute and damage the countryside here in the Peak District. It’s low hanging fruit for any council half serious about cutting emissions and protecting the local environment.

Ramsden Clough 22
Kirklees enables environmental damage from aging, modified and fuel heavy vehicles.

A permanent Traffic Regulation Order prohibiting motor vehicles from Ramsden Road ( and all other surrounding off road highways) would have an immediate effect in reducing pollution, carbon emissions  and improving the amenity value of the right of way for walkers,riders and cyclists. It would also meet the National Parks aims of both “quiet enjoyment” by the public and conservation. Removing vehicles permanently is the only realistic way to achieve  this  and allow the environment to recover.

Ramsden Clough 22-3
Off Piste action

Ramsden Rd 12_6_20-4
The £15k drainage works directing water back onto the byway!

 

Holmfirth Footpath 65 Works

HOL 63 repairs July 2020
August 2020 After surface & drainage works by Kirklees

Screenshot (32)
As it was in January 2018

Kirklees have just completed some extensive drainage & resurfacing works to Holmfirth Footpath 63, Old Lane. The works bring back into use a lovely path which should be good now for  a generation. Much improved from the wet January day in 2018 when it was surveyed. There is a claim currently logged with kirklees to upgrade the status of the way to bridleway. It’s now in a much better condition for shared use, as it must have originally been.

Thanks Kirklees 🙂

Holmfirth Byway 182 – Repaired. Thank You Kirklees

Holme Moss Byway
Completed works on Byway 182

Delighted to report that Holmfirth Byway 182 at the foot of Holme Moss has had substantial surface repairs and drainage works. It looks a good quality job which will benefit a wide range of users and not least the humble pedestrian. Thank you to the Kirklees frontline staff involved in this 🙂

Most of the damage to this byway has been caused by off road vehicles which inflicted deep ruts and craters on the surface and destroyed the drainage in the usual manner. Much damage has and is being done by these vehicles to adjacent land,all within the Peak District National Park. See photos at the foot of this piece.

Byway 182 is less than a mile away from the foot of the Ramsden Road Byway. It is interesting to compare and contrast how they have been dealt with. Ramsden Road is a 20 year saga of failure from Kirklees. There have been petitions for banning vehicles, reports to committee, aborted Traffic Regulation Orders,weak management, failed works,public meetings,interference from councillors supporting the motor vehicle lobby, £30k spent in the past 2 years (which has achieved very little) and laterly the formation of a friends group.

In contrast Byway 182 was reported as being out of repair less than 2 years ago. It has now been repaired to a good standard without any fuss.

I know which approach I prefer.

HOL 182 Surface
Typical condition of Holmfirth Byway 182 when reported as out of repair in November 2018.

Holme Moss Byway-2
Ongoing 4×4 damage to adjacent land

Holme Moss Byway-5
Ongoing 4×4 damage to adjacent land.Yellow sign warns against driving on this land.

Ramsden Road. What’s Not Been Done 2

Following on from Ramsden Road. What’s Not Been Done. The following photos show the current state of Ramsden Road  where it has been repaired & drained at a cost of £15k. Even after a modest amount of rain it clearly isn’t working. There is also damage by motorbikes to the new surface and fly tipping. Good money is being thrown after bad here and it is painful to watch.

Ramsden Rd June 20
Reopened culvert  with nowhere for the water to drain to. This could damage the wall and will surcharge back onto ramsden Road in wetter conditions.

Ramsden Rd June 20-4
Water running off Ramsden Road & eroding back the road edges. The culverts should have been retained with stone. The road levels here are low and the cause of this issue.Imagine a land rover driving on this edge.

Ramsden Rd June 20-2
A reopened culvert which discharges onto the adjacent drystone wall. The wall footings have been undercut in the recent works. Water accumulating here could undermine the wall over time and it will surcharge back onto Ramsden Road as it has nowhere else to go.

Ramsden Rd June 20-5
One of a number of basic grips cut into the verge of Ramsden Road (which was the best bit for pedestrians to walk on! ). Even after a very modest amount of rain water  accumulates at the base of adjacent dry stone wall. In wetter conditions the water will just back up onto Ramsden Road.

Ramsden Rd June 20-7
Another very basic grip. In 30 years I’ve never seen water accumulate at this point. Again it will surcharge back down Ramsden Road in wetter conditions.

Ramsden Rd June 20-9
Another reopened culvert but with nowhere for the water to get away.

Ramsden Rd June 20-6
Group of 8 motor bikes traveling at speed on Ramsden Road.

Ramsden Rd June 20-8
Damage by motor bikes to the new surface which has only been in place for 2 weeks. What will it be like after the winter?

Rams Rd-2
More motor bike damage. Where are pedestrians supposed to walk here?

Rams Rd
The yellow sandstone in the foreground here is the last remaining bit of the 2018 repairs. The grey stone beyond was put down just a couple of weeks ago and the potholing pattern caused by vehicles is already obvious.

Ramsden Road Flttipping 3_6_20
A very neat pile of fly tipping just inside the Peak District National Park section of Ramsden Road.

Ramsden Rd June 20-11
Same fly tipping 4 days later after a few 4×4 enthusiasts have driven through it.

Screenshot (13)
More rain is forecast over the next few days. Maybe it will wash the fly tipping away?

Private Land No Access Without Permission …Er No…It Isn’t.

Private sign
It’s not private land but access land in the Peak District National Park.

The land beyond this gate is access land in the Peak District National Park and the public have the right to walk here. There was a proliferation of these signs in the area. Most did refer to private property but not this one. I’d only walked this way because the footpath I intended to use was blocked!

Screenshot_2020-02-27-18-18-29
Private sign location. Shaded brown area is access land.

Ramsden Road Kirklees V Jacob’s Ladder Derbyshire 2

IMG_2331

In  Ramsden Road Kirklees V Jacob’s Ladder Derbyshire   PathWatch compared the two very different approaches of two seperate Highway Authorities within the Peak District National Park and how they make decisions on the management of problem Byways.

Derbyshire County Council are open,transparent and follow their authorities decision making process. Kirklees take more of a nudge,nudge,wink,wink approach and hold no record or documentation relating to their decision to overturn a delegated officer decision and drop their Ramsden Road TRO last December, having spent some £10k of public money in the process.

This is an interesting approach to doing things as it would appear to be well outside the Council’s constitution in terms of its decision making processes and of course shows the usual disregard for public money, residents concerns and the long suffering tax payer who funds it all.

 Derbyshire  have now made a TRO for Jacob’s Ladder at Stoney Middleton and because they follow due process the order and background information can be viewed at tro-jacobs-ladder . Kirklees have not followed the decision making process laid down in the Council’s constitution and it may be worth reading your tea leaves or seeing Mystic Meg as alternative sources of information.